www.markpiggott.com

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I'm the author of three novels, “Out of Office” and “Fire Horses" (both published by Legend Press), my new comic novel "Kidology," and a collection of short stories and creative non-fiction, "Militant Factions."  I've had dozens of major features in the Times, Sunday Times, Guardian, Independent, Mail, Express, Telegraph and many more. Email me at:

mark@markpiggott.com


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"Ian Davenport Lines Up Colorful Vision": read my interview with this fantastic artist

Posted on October 1, 2018 at 7:35 PM


Recently I was lucky enough to meet Turner-shortlisted artist Ian Davenport ahead of his new display at at the Waddington Custot Gallery in London. Read my interview at the Blouin Art Info website by clicking on the image.


Another massive thank you to the Royal Literary Fund!

Posted on September 15, 2018 at 7:45 PM


For the third year running I am deeply indebted to the wonderful Royal Literary Fund for their extremely generous grant. This money will enable me to finally finish some major projects I am very excited about – more details soon.

The RLF has been helping authors since 1790 and thanks to its support I have been able to concentrate on writing rather than simply working all hours to survive. I am now close to where I want to be – again, watch this space! – but will never forget their support and faith in my work - which couldn’t have come at a better time. I really hope one day I’m in position to repay their generosity in one form or another and would encourage all writers to apply for a grant if they are experiencing financial difficulty – and to donate if their circumstances are more comfortable.

Thank you RLF!

My latest Long Read at The Independent: "How I survived a holiday from hell"

Posted on August 21, 2018 at 5:15 PM


Sunday morning. On a particularly busy section of the A2 – our old car hemmed in by transcontinental lorries, all apparently in desperate need to reach Dover – the Citroen C4 begins to lose power. Even with my foot to the floor the speedo continues to drop – 30, 25, 20 – while behind me truck drivers help out as best they can by tooting horns and waving fists.

“There seems to be something wrong with the car,” I tell my wife.

READ THE REST OF MY LATEST "LONG READ" AT THE INDEPENDENT

PS Speaking of holiday nightmares - check out my comic novel KIDOLOGY (mentioned in the article). The perfect holiday read!




My latest Sunday Express feature: "Secrets and spies ...battle for Britain"

Posted on August 20, 2018 at 3:25 AM


"As Europe’s team claims the UK is bugging Brexit meetings, the Sunday Express finds the transcript* of a meeting attended by negotiator Michel Barnier, EC president Jean-Claude Juncker, Germany’s Angela Merkel and France’s Emmanuel Macron..."

*according to Mark Piggott

Read the rest of my latest Sunday Express feature HERE

My latest Independent column: "I'm an older dad but I was raised by a teenage mum"

Posted on August 4, 2018 at 7:25 PM


"On reading that former Tottenham Hotspur legend and shampoo salesman David Ginola has become a father again at the age of 51, my first response was: “Sacré bleu!” Sleepless nights, smelly nappies, illogical tantrums – that’s middle age for you. Who’d want to bring kids into it? However, having become a parent at a relatively late age myself (isn’t all parenting relative?) I must confess that my primary feeling for David is neither sympathy nor disgust, but envy..."

READ THE REST OF MY LATEST INDEPENDENT COLUMN HERE

"How a family hiking trip left me thinking about mortality": read my Long Reads feature in The Independent.

Posted on July 24, 2018 at 3:15 AM


"Rising from a stranger’s bed I pull aside the curtain and see the low isle of Anglesey floating in the Menai Strait: a fine day to climb Snowdon, first episode in what we hope will become the Three Peak Trilogy over coming weeks as part of my daughter’s Duke of Edinburgh challenge..."

Read the rest of my long, meandering feature in The Independent's Long Reads section.

The perils of being a World Cup widower: my latest Sunday Express column

Posted on July 8, 2018 at 6:05 AM


"Now, I’m as much of an England fan as the next man (if the next man is Jean-Claude Juncker) but to be honest, after three solid weeks the novelty of watching matches between two nations I’ve no interest in – perhaps a sandy Sultanate versus one of those central American countries where they throw losing managers from helicopters – has started to wane.

Trouble is my wife Lynda is from Liverpool, which means she’s genetically unable to miss a single match.

When she gets home from work she throws herself down in front of the widescreen with a cold beer and starts shouting at the players (not the ref, mind – her father was a referee which means she can explain the offside rule better than Alan Shearer)..."

READ THE REST OF MY LATEST SUNDAY EXPRESS COLUMN HERE

"Being a northerner is a state of mind" my latest column in today's Sunday Express

Posted on July 1, 2018 at 5:25 AM


"When a Newcastle academic called me a southerner recently I almost choked on my mushy peas. "Tripe!" I muttered. When my wife had handed me my tripe I had to resist the temptation to kick a whippet. Then I remembered it's only Northerners who are prone to sudden acts of irrational violence; as a southerner-elect I'm above such things, and resolved instead to buy a one-bed flat for half a million and stop saying "hello" to people on the street..."

Read the rest of my column in today's Sunday Express (no link - you'll have to buy it. Save Our Papers!)

World Cup Special: "Psycho Blitzkrieg" now available on Amazon

Posted on June 11, 2018 at 3:15 PM

In order to "celebrate" (ahem) England's guaranteed success at the World Cup Finals in Russia, why not read my surreal short story, "Psycho Blitzkrieg", about hooligans on the rampage on a terrifying new drug.

Here's a sample:

"The first game takes place in a nondescript city on the shore of a great lake, its name unfamiliar, unpronounceable, lost to search engine. "City" makes the place grander than it is: just a rambling string of shacks and blocks without planning or purpose. As the bus weasels in from the parochial airport below sludge sky all the damprise apartment blocks along each side of the strafed dirt road absorb what little light has managed to penetrate this gloom - particles of light which made it through 93 million miles of harsh space only to be stymied by the reflective murk of a second-world industrial zone - and as the crew look out through brown-streak panes I sense a deflation, a sense we're on alien territory where each individual person, creature, atom wishes us and our descendents harm.

"Looks like Sheffield," jokes Kirk beside me, and everyone laughs: loud, uneasy. I know why he made the joke: an anchor of familiarity in this dead world, this otherworld, a way of making it seem familiar, as Disney or Pixar make savage creatures seem human. An anthropomorphism of buildings, almost racist in its assumptions, because Kirk and those who laugh (me included) are really saying: these people are unknowable..."

Out now on Amazon - just 99p

Also available in my anthology, Militant Factions (£4 Kindle, £7.99 paperback).


My latest GIDSS Report from London: Clueless, Friendless, Lacking Vision But Theresa May Will Remain Prime Minister

Posted on June 4, 2018 at 6:40 AM


"Any doubts that UK Prime Minister Theresa May doesn't have a clue what she is doing have been well and truly dispelled by her Sunday Times column earlier in May. We now know for certain that the Prime Minister doesn't know what she is doing..."

READ THE REST OF MY LATEST GIDSS ARTICLE HERE

"The future generation is utterly baffling" - my latest parenting blog for the Independent

Posted on May 28, 2018 at 7:35 PM


"Older people have been moaning about younger people since Aristotle, but it does seem the generation gap has widened in recent decades – due partly to bewildering advances in technology, but also because the rise of the 'X Factor' follow-your-dream mantra..."

READ THE REST OF MY LATEST INDEPENDENT BLOG HERE.

Report from Windsor: Fairytale Royal Wedding Sets Back UK Republican Movement by 50 Years

Posted on May 21, 2018 at 1:25 PM

"Dysfunctional relatives, dodgy paparazzi deals, B-list TV celebrity, divorce, death, and tragedy: surely Meghan Markle knew what she was getting into when she entered into union with Prince Henry Charles Albert David Mountbatten-Windsor last Saturday? It's not as if the history of the Royal Family is a closely-guarded secret, so what on earth was this clever, ambitious girl 'straight outta' Santa Monica thinking?"

Read the rest of my latest GIDSS report here

"I live in a five bedroom council house which I don't need..." My latest feature at The Independent

Posted on May 12, 2018 at 9:30 AM


"No-one should be forced to move just because their circumstances have changed, but many tenants would like to downsize to escape the effects of the bedroom tax yet are unable to do so, because of draconian regulations on 'under-occupation'..."

Read the rest of my latest feature for The Independent here

PS Yes, I know I'm incredibly lucky, and yes, I know it's a Peabody house not a council house... thanks for pointing it out!

My latest GIDSS Report from London: What Do the Elections Really Mean?

Posted on May 11, 2018 at 7:15 PM

"It's just as well there are still four years until the next (scheduled) general election here in the UK, because if one was held next Thursday you'd need to be Nostradamus to predict the outcome. The main political parties are still raking over the coals of the local elections, held at the end of April across England, in search of patterns, messages and meaning—and all will have been cheered by the results, so long as they don't scrutinize the results too closely.

Take the Labour Party. Supporters of Jeremy Corbyn, who emerged from back-bench obscurity to become Leader in 2015, claim the results were a victory for his policies, personality and professionalism. Labour gained 77 councilors and retains control of 74 councils; this despite what Corbyn supporters insist is an overwhelmingly hostile press and charges of anti-Semitism which stubbornly refuse to go away..."

READ THE REST OF MY LATEST GIDSS FEATURE HERE.

Is Britain drifting towards the rocks? My latest GIDSS feature

Posted on May 5, 2018 at 11:15 AM


"It sometimes feels like the island of Great Britain is floating on stormy waters, its incompetent captain powerless to prevent mutiny, drifting between a series of treacherous rocks, all of which could hole her below the waterline. Brexit, Syria, Russia, energy, Ireland, migration and crime: these and other issues threaten at any moment to capsize the whole country..."

https://gidss.com/content/report-london-britain-drifting-towards-rocks" target="_blank">READ THE REST OF MY LATEST FEATURE FOR THE GLOBAL INSTITUTE FOR DEMOCRACY AND STRATEGIC STUDIES HERE.

Outcry is all much Apu about nothing - my latest Sunday Express comment

Posted on April 29, 2018 at 8:20 AM


"Liberal luvvies reacted with outrage when a journalist had the temerity to suggest that casting black actor Leo Wringer as a 17th-century English squire was misjudged. 'Was Mr Wringer cast because he is black?' he wrote. 'If so, the RSC's clunking approach to politically-correct casting has again weakened its stage product...'"

Read the rest of my provocative comment on why Hank Azaria is the true voice of Apu, Idris Elba should be the next Bond and Kathleen Turner is a transsexual we can all get behind in today's Sunday Express.

I'm officially an Oldie!

Posted on April 27, 2018 at 9:40 AM

I might have turned 50 a year ago, but I wasn't quite ready to admit I was an oldie. However today I can finally call myself one because my first piece, "employers who don't reply," has been published in the May 2018 issue of... The Oldie!

Get your copy here.

My latest GIDSS Blog: The U.K. Wrestles with the Russians: Who Really Wins?

Posted on March 20, 2018 at 4:45 PM

"The suspected Novichok nerve agent attack on former Russian spy, Sergei Skripal, and his daughter, Yulia, on March 4th in the leafy town of Salisbury, England has exposed not only age-old divisions between the West and Russia but also political divisions within the UK. Moscow has flatly denied involvement in the attack, which has left Sergei and Yulia critically ill and probably condemned to a slow, lingering death, but the UK government and much of the media have, perhaps predictably, been quick to point the finger East..."

Read the rest of my latest post for the US-based politics website the Global Institute for Democracy and Strategic Studies here.

My latest Spectator blog: the destructive culture of perfection

Posted on February 21, 2018 at 6:25 AM

"In the past week, two very different stories have highlighted our innate desire to generalise people, to raise them up as heroes, ciphers for the things we believe in, then bring them crashing down when they no longer keep to those high standards we probably don’t reach ourselves.

"There can’t be many compassionate people who haven’t been saddened by the news about Brendan Cox, husband of murdered MP Jo Cox. Whatever happened at Harvard back in 2015 – and it must have been fairly bad, even though he denies the more serious allegations – it’s depressing indeed that he has now stepped aside from two charities he set up following his wife’s ghastly murder at the hands of a disgusting, sad little fascist. Cox’s dignity and calls for restraint following his wife’s murder came when the country seemed riven with division, and probably prevented more serious unrest. Should he step aside now, because of a stupid, drunken incident?"

Read the rest of my latest Spectator blog here.

My latest Spectator blog: Men and women of the world, unite!

Posted on February 7, 2018 at 2:10 PM


"I’ve worked in several warehouses unloading stock and I’ve also worked in supermarkets stacking shelves. I’d have to say the latter is marginally harder. Not that there’s much in it: both are physically hard, mentally untaxing, and probably undervalued – but then, don’t we all feel undervalued at work?

"Warehouse jobs are more of a laugh. When unloading boxes that all looked the same, some were much heavier than others. If you were on the van you’d make out the heavy ones were light and vice versa. Oh, the japes we had… Best of all, there was usually an unloaded pallet you could hide behind for a nap. Whereas on the shop floor, surrounded by members of the public, with some tetchy manager in a cheap suit on your case, there were fewer opportunities for mayhem..."

https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2018/02/men-and-women-of-the-world-unite/" target="_blank">Read the rest of my latest Spectator blog here.


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